Ecomigration: Get Green by Becoming an Expat

In today’s difficult times, with the plummeting economy, jobs drying up and opportunities waning, there’s an endless list of reasons to relocate to somewhere that offers a brighter future. Here’s another reason: global warming.

ecomigration

That’s what Adam Fier and family decided before packing up and moving to New Zealand, according to the Washington Post. Fier, who is a former computer security professional at NASA, drew up a list of countries and regions which would fare better than others after 100 years of climate change. He decided that New Zealand was a much better fit for his family than the United States.

In fact, “eco-migration” has already become a serious reality throughout many parts of the world. Some residents of low-lying Pacific island nations are emigrating en masse due to rising sea levels. In Bangladesh, as storms, flooding and environmental disasters continue to increase year after year, millions of people have had to move elsewhere. Meanwhile, desertification continues to encroach upon Africans who are already plagued by drought and famine. And in the Phillipines, thousands have fled their homes due to deforestation.

All in all, there are an estimated 25 million “ecomigrants” around the globe, for one reason or another. With increased hurricanes, flooding and wildfires throughout various regions in the U.S., people here are starting to dream of greener pastures elsewhere too.

Of course, sheer desperation isn’t the only motivation for eco-migrating. For Adam Fier and family, avoiding the worst of global warming was only a small part of the decision to move. According to the article cited, nearly half of those who move to New Zealand do so for its “green environment”. It’s a world leader in renewable energy useage per capita, and it’s home to one of the world’s highest life expectancies.

Relocating to somewhere that helps you have less of an environmental footprint is as good a reason to move as any, and it’s something every future expat should take into consideration. Moving to somewhere for the cleaner air, clearer water and more predictable climate is good for you, but it’s only half as beneficial as living with a greener conscience too.

Image Credit: TopTechWriter.US at Flickr under a Creative Commons License

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